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Page 1

CERTAIN KNIVES

~eport to the President on
nvestigation No. TA-201-61
Jnder Section 201 of the
rrade Act of 197 4

US ITC PUBLICATION 2107

SEPTEMBER 1988

United States International Trade Commission • Washington, DC 20436

Page 2

UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION

COMMISSIONERS

Anne E. Brunsdale, Acting Chairman
Alf red E. F;ckes

Seeley G. Lodwick
Susan Liebeler
David B. Rohr
Ronald A. Cass

Staff assigned:

Brian Walters, Office of _Investigations
Karen Laney-Cummings, Office of Industries

Terry Planton, Office of Economics
Marshall Wade, Office of Investigations

Steve McLaughlin, Office of the General Counsel
Calvin Cobb, Office of the General Counsel

Vera Libeau, Supervisory Investigator

Address all communications to
Kenneth R. Mason, Secretary to the Commission

United States International Trade Commission
Washington, DC 20436

Page 96

A-28

Kasco Corp. is * * *· l/
Parker-Edwards Cutlery <Parker> started producing knives in 1985. * * *·

Parker started its operations with 10 e•ployees and has since expanded to
employ over BO people. When it began its operations, Parker hired numerous
people once e•ployed by Case, Berber, and Imperial. Parker produces between
290,000 and 300,000 outdoor knives a year. £.! In addition, • * *·

Regent-Sheffield, Ltd. * • *·

Rigid Knives <Rigid) * • *·

Robinson Knife "fg. Co, Inc. <Robinson>, * • *·
Tekoa Knives CTekna>, a producer of scuba diving equipment, began

producing knives with folding blades and hunting-type knives in 1986. * * *·

Timberline Knives, Inc. <Ti•berline> produces knives with folding blades
and hunting-type knives. * * *·

Utica Cutlery Co. <Utica> stopped producing kitchen-type knives in 1985.

Washington Forge, Inc., * * *·
Western Cutlery Company <Western) * * *·
In addition to Parker, Tekna, a~d Timberline, it is alleged that there are

several other new entrants into the U.S. knife industry: Bench•ade Knives,
Blueg~ass Cutlery, Boyd Cutlery, Cripple Creek Cutlery, laker Knife Works, and
Leatherman Tool Group. "J.j Of these alleged new entrants, the Commission has
confirmed that four produce very small quantities of knives. Leatherman Tool
Group * * *· Bluegrass Cutlery * * *· ii

The following list presents the n~•es of U.S. producers which, according
to the petition, have terminated knife production or closed certain of their
production facilities during the ~ast 5 years: ~/

!_I Telephone interview with * * *• June 23, 1988.
£.! Parker Cutlery Association, letter to the Commission, June 27, 1988.
"J.j Bernard Levine, "Statement in Opposition to Petition of American Cutlery
Manufacturers Association, Investigation Nu•ber TA-201-61, Certain Knives, 0

June 6, 1988, p. B. .
if Also see Thompson, Hine, and Flory, 0 P6sthearing Brief on Behalf of the
American Cutlery "anufacturers Association,• June 28, 1988, pp. 31-32.
~ See petition in investigation No. TA-201-61 1 p. 12.

Page 97

A-29

Boker Division, Cooper Industries
Ekco HouseNares, Inc.
Ideal Knife Co., Inc.
Imperial Schrade Corp. <Providence, RI. facility>
Keene Corp.
Olsen Knife Co.
Rigid Knives
Smith & Wesson
Tennessee Knife Works
Tommer-Bordein Corp.
Washington Forge, Inc.

Of these alleged closures, the Commission has confirmed six •. Two of these
six companies, however, •ere purchased by other companies that no• produce
knives[ one is now involved in toll production of knives •hereby it imports
knife blades and has contracted with a•other fir• that manufactures knife
handles to assemble and package finished knives; one has consolidated its
closed facility with. a ne• facility that produces knives; and one continues to
utilize.its machinery and equipment in the production of other nonsubject
articles. The re11a1n1ng company ter11inated knife production in late 1997 and
is selling the remainder of its inventory and ltioking for a buyer.

Of the remaining five alleged closures, one did not terminate its knife
production but rather changed its name when it acquired another company; one,
although it was sold, continues to operate as a subsidiary of its purchaser and
produce knives under its own name; one terminated knife production prior to
1983 and continued to customize knives until recently when it agreed to sell
its equipment to another U.S. producer; and the staff has been unable to
contact two firms.

There has been at least one new entrant into the U.S. knife industry that
was not connected with any of the alleged closures: Parker-Ed~ards Cutlery.

Specific details of the 1Lalleged closures is presented below: !./

Boker Division, Cooper Industries, stopped producing knives with folding
blades in 1985. According to * * *· ~./

Ekco Housewares, Inc. <Ekco>,·***, terminated production of .kitchen-type
knives and steak knives in 1985. * * *·

Ideal Knife Co., Inc. * * *·

!./ Also see Thompson, Hine, and Flory, •posthearing Brief on Behalf of the
A11erican Cutlery "anufacturers Association, 0 June 28, i988, pp. 31-32.
'l/ Telephone interview with * * *1 June 27, 1988. Also see Howrey & Simon,
0 Prehearing Brief Filed on Behalf of the 6~r~an Cutlery ~ Flatware
"anufacturers Association, the Representative for German Industry and Trade,.
and the Federation of European Cutlery and Flatware Industries,n June 16, 1988,
pp. 26 and 27.

Page 191

B-17

Table C-5
Knife blades, handles, and other parts: LI U.S. i1ports for consumption, by principal sources,
1983-87, January-"arch 1987, and January-"arch 1988

January-"arch--
Source 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1987 1988

Quantity (1,000 pieces)

Japan .•••••.•••••••. 9, 717 14,064 17,692 16,763 17,995 4,132 3,124
Taiwan •.•••.•••.•••. 2, 119 4,387 6,522 7,650 8,971 1,463 2,031
United Kinqdo1 •.•.•. 5, 725 4, 150 1, 962 4,895 8,475 1,980 2,216
Israel •••••••••••.•. 19 49 83 55 6,017 54 93
West 6er1any •••••••. 1, 917 2,548 2,684 2,133 3,667 544 383
Colo1bia •••.•••••.•. 1,725 1,276 911 1,257 1, 776 453 887
India ••.•.•••.•••.•. 56 30 2,009 1,836 1,138 348 ?_/
Canada •.•••.•.•.•.•• 1,015 674 680 307 937 123 9
Switzerland ••.•••••. 63 180 238 468 892 343 259
Den1ark ••••.•••.•.•. 400 l ,293 800 ?_/ 760 400 ?_/
All other .•••.•.•.•. 11727 l 1822 l, 936 11055 l 1866 292 21051

Total ••...•.•.•. 24,483 31),474 35.517 361418 52,495 101030 10,054

Value 11 1000 dollarsl 3/

Japan .•.•.•.•••.•.•. l, 306 2,283 2,557 3,552 3,882 718 829
Tai11an ...••...•.•••. 154 540 1,064 981 1,207 152 264
United Kinqdo1 •.•... 638 547 305 825 1, 963 250 504
Israel •.•.•.•••.•.•• 27 42 70 35 83 35 24
West Germany •••.•.•. 326 466 365 379 546 151 113
Colo1bia •.•.•••.•... 341 232 168 222 364 85 202
India ............... 14 81 179 355 107 60 3
Canada .............. 175 137 127 59 99 10 3
S11itzerland ••••••••. 27 120 64 169 178 57 185
Den1ark .•.•••.•••.•. 16 51 27 6 30 17 T ..,
Al 1 other .... t ... ... 271 849 1. 014 706 1.092 225 512

Total •.••.•••.•. 3,293 5,348 5,940 7,288 9,551 1, 760 2,641
'

--
ti Includes i1ports in TSUSA ite1s 649.8500 !blades, handles, and other parts for knives 11ith
folding bladesl and 650.0100 (blades for fixed blade knives, i.e. kitchen-type knives, steak
knives, hunting-type knives, without their handles!.
~/ Less than 500 pieces.
~I Import values are c.i.f. duty-paid values.

Note.--Because of rounding, figures 1ay not add to the totals shown.

Source: Co1piled fro• official statistics of "the U.S. Departaer.t of Co11erce.

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