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Document Text Contents
Page 1

Eduard Gufeld

�CCEJ7TED

Page 2

FOR CHESS ... READ BATSFORD FOR CHESS ... READ BATSFORD

Although the Queen's Gambit was first mentioned by Polerio at the
end of the sixteenth century, the accepted form of the gambit is
essentially a twentieth century concept.

Black surrenders the centre in order to develop his pieces quickly
and aims to strike back with the freeing moves ... c5 or ... e5 at a
later stage. Such great players as Smyslov, Bronstein and Flohr have
been regular exponents of this defence and it has a justly reliable
reputation.

With the great volume of theory in the main lines of the Queen's
Gambit , this work provides an early alternative for Black which
does not require reams of analysis. The system can be understood
quickly and will prove a sound and reliable weapon for the club
and tournament player.

Grandmaster Eduard Gufeld is a noted theoretician who is trainer
for the Soviet Women's Olympiad team. He is author of The
Sicilian Defence and Exploiting Small Advantages ..
172 diagrams

Batsford Gambit Series
This exciting new series of opening works has been designed to meet the
needs of the competitive player. Each volume deals with a particular
opening and the early attempts to obtain sharp and interesting play by a
pawn sacrifice. All the authors are top International Masters and
Grandmasters and the series is under the general editorship of
CM Raymond Keene .

Also in this series.
King's Gambit
Viktor Korchnoi and Vladimir Zak

Spanish Gambits
Leonid Shamkovich and Eric Schiller

Budapest Gambit
Otto Borik

Open Gambits
George Botterill

Other recent opening books include
Caro-Kann: Classical4 ... Bf5
Cary Kasparov and Alexander
Shakarov

Grand Prix Attack: f4 against the
Sicilian
Julian Hodgson and Lawrence Day

Spanish without ... a6
Mikhail Yudovich

Vienna and Bishop's Opening
Alexander Konstantinopolsky and
Vladimir Lepeshkin

For a complete I ist of Bats ford chess
books please write to
B. T. Batsford Ltd,
4 Fitzhardinge Street,
London W1H OAH.

ISBN 0 7134 5342 7

Page 65

a draw after 1 0 lid! 0-0 I I i.f4
lt:Jxc3 1 2 't!¥xc3 i.e4 1 3 \lt'e3 lLlf6
1 4 i.g5. White can fight for the
advantage with 10 �3, and if
10 . . . lLlb6, then 1 1 a4 with a slight
initiative.

9 h6
Black might have adopted this

plan on the 8th move as well, in
order to keep the bishop from g5,
and create a retreat square for the
light-squared bishop which can go
from f5 to h7.

10 e3!?
White plays along the lines of

the Bogoljubow-Alekhine game.
An alternative is 10 't!t'b3 'Wb6

1 1 'tWd l 0-0 1 2 lie ! lifd8 1 3 e4
i.h7 14 a3 with a more comfortable
game for White, Kudishchevich­
lvanov, Rostov-on-Don 198 1 .

10 :iid1 ?? is a blunder because
of 10 . .. i.c2 with the threat of
I I . . . lLlb6, and White must part
with the exchange.

1 0 0-0
1 1 'i!Ve2

White regroups his forces,
intending to advance his e-pawn
with an initiative in the centre.
Fedorowicz-Williams, New York
1 982, continued 1 1 . . . lLle4 1 2 lLld2
lLlxd2 1 3 i.xd2 lLlf6 14 e4 i.g6 1 5
i.e3 't!¥a5 1 6 a 3 with advantage to
White, although Black's position
is very solid.
B

4 lLlc6 (86)

86
w

4 'ii'a4+ 55

This is an active continuation.
Black attempts to play against the
pawn on d4.

5 lLlc3
The most active reply. White

places the e4 and d5 squares under
his control, intending e4. Other
continuations have been tried:
a) 5 g3 .i.e6 6 .i.g2 'Wd7 7 lLlc3
lLld5 (7 . . . i.d5 is dubious because
of 8 lLlxd5 lLlxd5 9 1!¥xc4, for
example 9 . . . lLlb6 1 0 'Wb3 'Wd5 1 1
'Wd3 e6 1 2 0-0 with lasting
pressure on the long diagonal and
c-file, Tukmakov-Kozlov, USSR
1984) 8 'Wxc4 (8 .i.g5 is less clear
after 8 . . . lLlb6) 8 . . . lLlxc3 9 'Wxc3
.i.d5 with a comfortable game for
Black.
b) 5 e3 lLld7!? (this forces White to
capture at c4 with the queen) 6
'i!Vxc4 e5 !? (against 6 . . . g6?! White
can play 7 'Wc2 .i.g7 8 .i.b5! lLlcb8
9 0-0 0-0 10 lid 1 with the more
active game, Knezevic-Banas, Stary
Smokovec 1974) 7 de (not 7 d5

Page 66

56 4 �a4+

lt:\b6 and the pawn on d5 falls) 7 . . .
lt:\dxe5 8 lt:\xe5 lt:\xe5 9 �b5+ lt:\d7
10 i.e2 c6 1 1 �c4 i.d6 12 �e4+
i.e7 1 3 0-0 lt:\f6 1 4 �c2 0-0 with a
fully satisfactory game for Black,
Andersson-Tim man, Til burg 1982.

5 lt:\dS
6 �xc4

The sharp 6 e4!? lt:\b6 7 �d 1
i.g4 8 d5 lt:\e5 9 i.f4 lt:\g6 has
not been sufficiently investigated.
Botvinnik-Petrosian, match 1 963,
was agreed drawn after 10 i.e3? !
e6, but 1 0 i.g3 !? i s stronger, after
which play might continue 1 0 . . . e5
1 1 de i.xe6 1 2 �xd8+ l:ixd8 ( 1 2 . . .
o;i;:>xd8!? 1 3 0-0-0+ wc8 1 4 lLlb5! ;!;)
1 3 .txc7 lild7 1 4 i.xb6 ab and the
weakness of the pawn structure on
Black's queenside guarantees an
advantage for White, Raj kovic­
Barle, Yugoslavian Ch 1 983. [This
line was also seen in A lburt­
Dlugy, USA Ch 1 984, which saw
the introduction of 1 3 . . . lilc8 ! ,
although after 1 4 i.g3 a 6 1 5 lt:\d4
i.c5 1 6 0-0-0 0-0 1 7 i.e2 i.d 7 1 8
lt:\f5! White could still lay claim to
a large advantage. Alburt suggests
1 4 . . . i.c5 !? which awaits practical
tests - tr.]

6 lt:\db4
On 6 . . . i.e6 7 e4 ! is a strong

response, for example 7 . . . lt:\db4 8
d5 ! lt:\c2+ 9 �d l lt:\xa l 1 0 i.d2
with advantage for White, Hort­
Rivas, Montilla 1 978. More precise
is 7 . . . lLlb6 8 �c5 i.d7 with better

chances for White.
7 't!fb3

8 7
w

eS!? (87)

The variation 7 . . . lt:\xd4 8 lt:\xd4
�xd4 9 i.e3 i.e6 l 0 �a4+ i.d7
1 1 '@'b3 i.e6 leads to a draw,
Andersson-K orchnoi, Johannes­
burg 1 98 1 .

The text move hides a subtle
trick: 8 a3 i.e6 9 'it'd 1 ed 10 lLlb5
a6 1 1 lt:\bxd4 lt:\xd4 12 lt:\xd4
�xd4! with advantage to Black,
Botterill-Miles, England 1 979. On
8 d5 play might continue 8 . . .
lt:\d4! with advantage to B lack,
and on 8 de either 8 . . . i.e6 or 8 . . .
i.g4 can be tried, with sharp and
unclear play.

c
4 lt:\bd7 (88)

This is the Catalanish con­
tinuation. White can, if he wishes,
play 5 g3 e6 6 ,ig2 or 5 '@'xc4 e6 6
g3, transposing to that opening.

There is only one variation with
independent significance.

Page 129

White can strengthen h is position
with 12 lUeS) 12 �e2 l:ie8 13 l:iad1
lt:JdS (On 1 3 . . . lt:Jb4 White can play
14 lUeS i.e8 l S i.b3� with much
the freer position) 14 i.xdS i.xgS
1S i.e4 i.f6 16 dS! ed 17 lt:JxdS
i.e6 18 lt:Jf4 (This is a difficult
moment for Black. White's central
initiative seems ominous, but Black
could have erected a solid defence
with 18 . . . 'W/e7 19 lt:Jxe6 fe) 18 . . .
'in>6?! 19 lt:Jxe6 fe 20 'W/d3! (This
highlights the weakness of Black's
kingside) 20 . . . g6? (197)

(This permits a direct attack. Re­
latively better here was 20 . . . h6)
21 i.xg6! hg 22 1!t'xg6+ 'i&h8 (Or 22
. . . i.g7 23 1!t'xe6+ 'i!i>h8 24 l:ie4 -++)
23 1!t'h6+ 'i!i>g8 24 1!t'g6+ 'i!i>h8 2S
l:id7 lt:Je7 26 'WihS+ 'i!i>g7 27 lUgS!

(After this White wins by force) 27
... i.xgS 28 'WixgS+ 'i!i>h8 29 1!t'h4+
'i!i>g8 30 l:ixe7 l:if7 31 l:ixf7 'i!i>xf7
32 1!t'h7+ \t>f6 33 h4 l:ie4 34 'it'h6+
..tf7 3S 'WihS+ \t>f8 36 1!t'h6+ we7
3 7 1!t'g7+ 'it>e8 38 1!t'f6 1-0

//Justrative Games 1 19

Karpov-Portiseh
Tilburg 1983

1 d4 dS 2 e4 de 3 lt:Je3 a6!? (This is
an interesting possibility for Black.
The idea is . . . bS in favourable
circumstances) 4 lt:Jf3 ( 4 e4 is
sharper) 4 ... bS S a4 b4 6 lt:Je4
lt:Jd7!? 7 lt:Jed2 (This is forced
because of the threat of 7 . . . i.b7,
although White can also play 7
'it'c2 i.b7 8 lt:Jed2 c3 9 be e6, when
Black will be able to play . . . cS
with good equalising chances) 7 ...
e3 8 be be 9 lt:Je4 lt:Jgf6 10 lt:Jxe3 e6
11 e3 i.b4 12 i.d2 eS (Black has a
fully playable game) 13 i.e2 0-0 14
0-0 i.b7 1S l:ib1 l:ib8 16 lt:Ja2 i.aS!
(After 16 . . . i.xd2?! 17 'i!t'xd2 Black
has problems in developing his
queen: 17 . . . 'it'e7?! 19 'it' aS ! or 1 7
. . . lt:Je4 1 8 'i!Vc2! with advantage to
White) 1 7 'it'el !? i.e7!? 18 de lUxeS
19 i.b4 i.d6 20 i.xeS!? (The ex­
change is made in order to gain
time. On the natural 20 lt:Jc3 Bla�k
could play 20 . . . i.xf3 ! with an
advantage) 20 .. . i.xeS 21 1!t'e3
'it'e7?! (Black weakens h is control
over aS, and White im mediately
takes advantage of this. Better was
21 . . . i.d6 and then 22 . . . 'it'e7, with
better chances for Black) 22 'it'aS!
22 . . . lt:JdS 23 l:ib3! i.b6 24 'Wid2
l:ifd8 25 'Wib2 (White has resolved
the difficult question of the develop­
ment of his queen, and now the
counterplay along the b-file brings
him equality) (198)

Page 130

120 Illustrative Games

198

B
25 ... i.c6 26 li:lb4! (The final prob­
lem for White is neatly solved with
the entrance of his knight into the
game) 26 . . . li:lxb4 27 lixb4 i.xf3
28 i.xf3 i.d4!? 29 lib7! (White has
no more problems, so . . . ) 29 . . .
lixb7 1/z-1/z

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