Download food safety PDF

Titlefood safety
File Size1.4 MB
Total Pages329
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Preface
Acronyms
Part 1. Overview of Food Safety
	1. An Overview of Food Safety
		Safe Food Defined
		Food Hazards
		Factors That Contribute to Foodborne Illness
		History of Food Safety
		The Role of Food Preservation in Food Safety
		Sources
	2. Issues in Food Safety
		Genetically Engineered Foods
		Bovine Somatotropin
		Food Irradiation
		Pesticide Residues in Foods
		Drinking Water Quality
		Restaurant Food Safety
	3. Chronology of Food Safety-Related Events
		Sources
	4. Food Safety Regulation
		History of Food Safety Regulation
		Who Regulates Food Safety Today?
		Sources
	5. Food Safety Statistics
		Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet)
		CDC Surveillance for Foodborne-Disease Outbreaks, 1993–1997
		Waterborne Disease Outbreaks, 1997–1998
		Medical Costs of Foodborne Illness
		Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Systems (BRFSS)
		Home Food Safety Survey
		Sources
	6. Careers in Food Safety
		Education
		Scholarships, Internships, and Fellowships
Part 2. Resources
	7. Reports and Brochures
		Reports
		Brochures
	8. Books and Newsletters
		Books
		Newsletters
	9. Internet Web Sites and Electronic Media
		Internet Web Sites
		Databases
		Email Discussion Groups
		Email News Distribution Groups
		Reference Tools
	10. Educational Materials
		Children—General Food Safety
		Children—Biotechnology, Pesticides, Additives
		Consumers—General Food Safety
		Consumers—Biotechnology, Pesticides, Additives
		Consumers—Seniors
		Food Service Workers—General Food Safety
		Food Service Workers—HACCP
		Handwashing
		Providers at Child Day Care Centers and Institutions
		School Food Service
		Volunteers at Picnics, Church Suppers, Fairs, Food Banks
	11. Organizations, Cooperative Extension, Hotlines, State and Local Agencies
		Organizations
		Cooperative Extension Offices
		Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Public Affairs Specialists
		Hotlines
		State Departments of Health and/or Agriculture
		State Meat Inspection Programs
Glossary
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	K
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	Z
Index
	A
	B
	C
	D
	E
	F
	G
	H
	I
	J
	K
	L
	M
	N
	O
	P
	R
	S
	T
	U
	V
	W
	Y
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

THE FOOD SAFETY
INFORMATION HANDBOOK


Cynthia A. Roberts

Oryx Press
2001

Page 164

Environmental Working Group (EWG). August
17, 1995. Weed Killers by The Glass. Washington,
DC: Environmental Working Group.
Web site: Available full-text at http:// www.
ewg.org/pub/home/reports/Weed_Killer/
Weed_Home.html

This report examines the magnitude of tap wa-
ter contamination with weed killers, including the
severity and duration of peak levels of exposure that
routinely exceed federal health standards during
the three- to four-month peak runoff period. The
results of these tests reveal widespread contamina-
tion of tap water with many different pesticides at
levels that present serious health risks.

Environmental Working Group (EWG). July 26,
1995. Pesticides in Baby Food. Washington, DC:
Environmental Working Group.
Web site: Available full-text at http://www.ewg.
o rg / p u b / h o m e / r e p o r t s / B a b y _ f o o d /
Baby_home.html

This report examines the extent of pesticide
contamination of baby food. After a review of in-
fant risks from pesticides, data is presented on
EWG’s analysis of eight foods (applesauce, garden
vegetables or pea-and-carrot blend, green beans,
peaches, pears, plums, squash, and sweet potatoes)
made by the three major baby food producers that
account for 96 percent of all baby food sales.

Environmental Working Group (EWG). Febru-
ary 1995. Forbidden Fruit: Illegal Pesticides in the
U.S. Food Supply. Washington, DC: Environmen-
tal Working Group.
Web site: Available full-text at http:// www.
ewg.org/pub/home/reports/Fruit/Contents.
html

Forbidden Fruit analyzes 14,923 computer-
ized records from the Food and Drug Administra-
tion’s (FDA) routine pesticide monitoring
program for the fiscal years 1992 and 1993. Viola-
tions of pesticide laws are reported in excess of
what U.S. government agencies claim.

Environmental Working Group (EWG). October
18, 1994. Tap Water Blues. Washington, DC: En-
vironmental Working Group, Physicians for So-
cial Responsibility.

This report is an analysis of pesticide contami-
nation of drinking water supplies in the Midwest.
It identifies more than 10 million individuals ex-
posed to five herbicides (atrazine, cyanazine,
simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor) at levels that
exceed EPA’s negligible cancer risk standard of
one additional cancer case per million individuals.

Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food
Additives (JECFA). February 2000. Veterinary
drugs residues. Rome: Food and Agriculture Or-
ganization.
Web site: Available full-text at http://www.
fao.org/waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/
jecfa/jecfa54.pdf

The result of an FAO Expert Committee on
Food Additives held in Geneva February 15–24,
2000, this report elaborates on principles for
evaluating the safety of veterinary drug residues
in food and for establishing acceptable daily in-
takes and maximum residue limits.

FAO/NACA/WHO Study Group. 1999. Food
Safety Issues Associated with Products from
Aquaculture. Technical Report Series, No. 883.
Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization.
Web site: Available full-text at http://www.
who.int/fsf/trs883.pdf

This report is the result of an expert assess-
ment of risks to human health that may arise from
the consumption of farmed finfish and crusta-
ceans. The core of the report provides a complete
assessment of all potential biological and chemi-
cal hazards. Included are strategies for control-
ling biological and chemical hazards and
recommendations and conclusions reached dur-
ing the assessment.

FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. March 1999.
Risk Assessment of Microbiological Hazards in
Foods. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organiza-
tion.
Web site: Available full-text at http:// www.
fao.org/waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/
hazard/hazard.htm

The result of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Con-
sultation on the Risk Assessment of Microbiologi-
cal Hazards in Foods held in Geneva March
15–19, 1999, the objectives of the consultation
were to examine current scientific knowledge
concerning microbiological risk assessment for
food and related issues, recommend an overall
strategy and framework for risk assessment, rec-
ommend methodologies for risk assessment suit-
able for use at an international level to estimate the
risk that microbiological hazards pose to human
health, and suggest priority issues in risk assess-
ment.

FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. February
1998. Application of Risk Communication to
Food Standards and Safety Matters. Report no.
70. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization.

149

Reports and Brochures

Page 165

Web site: Available full-text at http:// www.
fao.org/waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/
riskcomm/HTTOC.htm

This report is the result of a Joint FAO/WHO
Expert Consultation on the Application of Risk
Communication to Food Standards and Safety
Matters held in Rome February 2–6, 1998. The
goals of the consultation were to identify the ele-
ments of, and recommend guiding principles for,
effective risk communication; to examine the
barriers to effective risk communication and to
recommend means by which they can be over-
come; to identify strategies for effective risk com-
munication within the risk analysis framework;
and to provide practical recommendations to
FAO, WHO, Member Governments, Codex
Alimentarius Commission (CAC), other interna-
tional and national organizations, industry, and
consumers to improve their communication on
matters related to the risk assessment and man-
agement of food safety hazards.

FAO Expert Consultation. March 1997. Animal
Feeding and Food Safety. Report no. 69. Rome:
Food and Agriculture Organization.
Web site: Available full-text at http://www.
fao.org/waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/
animal/animapdf/contents.htm

The result of an FAO Expert Consultation on
Animal Feeding and Food Safety held in Rome
March 10–14, 1997, this report includes a draft
code of practice for good animal feeding; an
overview of the control of health factors in the
production of animal feed; an overview of infec-
tions and intoxications of farm livestock associ-
ated with feed and forage; and standards,
guidelines, and other recommendations related
to the quality and safety of feed and foods from
the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. January
1997. Risk Management and Food Safety. Report
no. 65. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organiza-
tion.
Web site: Available at http://www.fao.org/
waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/risk/
riskcont.htm

This report is the result of a Joint FAO/WHO
Expert Consultation on the Application of Risk
Management to Food Safety Matters held in
Rome January 27–31, 1997. The main goal of
this consultation was to arrive at a series of rec-
ommendations on the application of risk man-
agement to food safety, dealing with the
management of risk from both chemical and bio-

logical hazards in food and covering the full range
of acute and chronic adverse health effects.

FAO/WHO Expert Consultation. October
1996. Biotechnology and Food Safety. Report no.
61. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization.
Web site: Available full-text at http://www.fao.
org/waicent/faoinfo/ECONOMIC/esn/
biotech/tabconts.htm

This Expert Consultation addressed the evalu-
ation of the safety, for purposes of consumption,
of all food and food components produced using
techniques involving biotechnology, whether
plant, animal, or microbial in origin.

Food & Water. 1998. Meat Monopolies: Dirty
Meat and the False Promises of Irradiation.
Walden, VT: Food & Water.

This special report takes a critical look at food
irradiation.

FAO Panel of Experts on Pesticide Residues in
Food and the Environment. Ongoing. Pesticide
Residues in Food and the Environment. Report no.
148. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization.
Web site: Available full-text at http:// www.fao.
org/waicent/faoinfo/AGRICULT/agp/agpp/
Pesticid/jmpr/pm_jmpr.htm

The Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Pesticide
Residues has met annually since 1963 to conduct
scientific evaluations of pesticide residues in food.
It provides advice on the acceptable levels of pesti-
cide residues in food moving in international
trade.

Food Marketing Institute and Grocery Manufac-
turers Association. 1998. Consumer’s Views on
Food Irradiation. Washington, DC: Food Mar-
keting Institute and Grocery Manufacturers Asso-
ciation.

A one-stop shop for information about irradia-
tion, this report provides background informa-
tion as well as insight into consumers’ attitudes
about irradiation. It contains many charts and
graphs to explain the data and is easy to read.

Food Marketing Policy Center. 1998. Mandatory
vs. Voluntary Approaches to Food Safety. Research
Report No. 36. Storrs, CT: University of Con-
necticut.
Web site: Available full-text at http:// vm.uconn.
edu/~cotteril/rr36.pdf

This report examines whether a voluntary ap-
proach to food safety is likely to lead to adequate
consumer protection.

150

Resources

Page 328

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

Page 329

About the Author

CYNTHIA A. ROBERTS is a faculty member at the Department of Nutrition and Food Sci-
ence, University of Maryland. She has been the Coordinator of the USDA/FDA Foodborne
Illness Education Information Center since its creation in 1994. The center is located at the Na-
tional Agricultural Library in Belstville, MD and is funded and supported as part of a partner-
ship between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and the
National Agricultural Library. In 1998 Ms. Roberts was a recipient of the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration Commissioner’s Special Citation for fostering the exchange of information about
food safety education between public and private sector organizations.

Similer Documents