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23

1 Identity match

Recording vocabulary
Mind-maps�are�a�useful�way�to�record�vocabulary.�They�appeal�
to�visual�learners�and�help�to�show�how�words�connect�and�
relate�to�each�other.�They�can�also�provide�a�very�effective�
revision�tool�when�students�come�to�exam�time.

Ask�students�to�write�the�key�word�for�this�unit�(identity)�in�
the�centre�of�a�blank�page�in�their�notebooks.�They�could�then�
record�words�related�to�this�theme,�organised�in�categories�
with�sub-headings.�They�can�add�new�words�as�they�learn�
them�through�the�unit.�

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: STuDEnT TRAInInG

3a PRonunCIATIon � �1.02�Ask�students�to�say�the�words�and�
decide�if�we�pronounce�gh in�the�words.�Check�answers�in�
open�class,�then�listen�and�check.

Key

gh is not pronounced.

Silent�letters�can�make�English�pronunciation�difficult.�Point�
out�to�students�that�some�silent�combinations�are�easy�to�
spot�because�the�words�would�be�difficult�to�pronounce�if�you�
sound�the�letters.�Ask�a�student�to�try�to�pronounce�the�words�
with�-gh to�illustrate�this.

It�is�important�for�students�to�understand�that�in�general�
English�is�not�phonetic.�You�cannot�always�look�at�an�English�
word�and�know�how�to�say�it,�or�hear�an�English�word�and�
know�how�to�spell�it.�

Build�students’�pronunciation�skills�by�focusing�for�a�short�time�
on�key�features�in�every�lesson.�Regular�practice�will�help�add�
correctly�pronounced�words�to�students’�vocabulary.

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: PRonunCIATIon

Vocabulary p6
Appearance
Warmer
In�pairs,�students�discuss�the�meaning�of�the�unit�title�Identity
match and�what�they�think�the�unit�is�going�to�be�about.�Elicit�
ideas�from�around�the�class.�

Suggested answer

Identity – the qualities that make someone or something what
they are and different from other people.
Match – if one thing matches another, or if they match, they are
the same or have similar qualities.
The theme of this unit is appearance and personality.

1 In�pairs,�students�put�the�words�in�the�correct�columns.�Draw�
their�attention�to�the�examples�in�the�table.�You�may�like�to�
provide�students�with�dictionaries�to�help�them�with�this�task.

2 �1.01�Play�the�CD�for�students�to�listen,�check�and�repeat.

Audioscript and Key

Build Height Hair General

thin

well-built

overweight

short

medium-
height

tall

short

bald

blonde

curly

dark

fair

long

straight

handsome

good-looking

plain

pretty

ugly

Developing
speaking p14

Asking for and giving personal information

Developing
writing p15

An informal email describing people

Language
reference
and revision
p16–17

Grammar: present simple and present
continuous, adverbs and expressions of
frequency, state and action verbs
Vocabulary: appearance, personality,
synonyms and partial synonyms

Study skills
p146

General: Taking active responsibility for
your learning
Grammar: How to study grammar effectively

Exam success
p150

Reading: True-false activities

mATERIALS DVD (optional): A Hard Day’s Night
Resource materials teacher’s notes p168
Resource materials: p178–180
Test 1A and B – Gateway Tests CD

Vocabulary/
Developing
vocabulary
p6, 9

Appearance
Personality
Synonyms and partial synonyms

Reading p7 Gamers and their avatars: reading for global and
specific information

Grammar in
context p8–9,
12–13

Present simple and present continuous
State and action verbs

CLICK onto …
English
national
identity p10–11

International cultural knowledge
English icons

Popular culture
‘She’s leaving home’ by The Beatles

Listening p12 Identifying key words and listening for gist
People and their pets

Pronunciation
p6

Pronouncing gh

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negative prefixes
The�prefixes�un-, in- and�im- can�form�antonyms�(opposites)�
of�adjectives�in�English.�The�most�common�prefix�is�un- = ‘the�
opposite�of’, but�there�are�no�hard�and�fast�rules�for�which�
prefix�students�should�use�(except�words�that�start�with�the�
letters�b, m and p always�take�the�prefix�im- rather�than�in-.�
Advise�them�to�consult�a�dictionary�if�they�have�doubts.�

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: LAnGuAGE

6 Students�match�the�personality�adjectives�with�their�
definitions.

Key

1 arrogant 4 clever 6 reliable
2 selfish 5 shy 7 bossy
3 nice

7 LISTEnInG � �1.03�Play�the�CD�for�students�to�listen�to�four�
people�talking�about�themselves.�Ask�them�to�note�the�
adjective�of�personality�that�best�describes�each�person.�
Elicit�answers�from�students�around�the�class�and�ask�them�
to�remember�key�phrases�in�the�listening�that�helped�them�
decide�on�their�answers�(key�phrases�are�underlined�in�the�
audioscript).

Audioscript�

Rose: Well, yes, I suppose that it is fair to call me that. I dunno, it’s
just that I love sleeping. I hate getting up early. And if you give
me a choice between doing something active like sport or just
lying on a sofa watching TV all day, I definitely go for lying on
the sofa. And even better if I can stay in my pyjamas all day.

William: No, the thing is that I don’t THINK I’m the best, the
most intelligent and the most attractive. I AM the best, the
most intelligent and the most attractive. In fact I’m the best at
EVERYTHING.

Jessica: I HATE it when people move my things. In my room,
everything is always in exactly the right place. I never leave my
clothes out and my desk is always ready for work. The thing is
that when you’re like me, you always know where to find things.

BRandon: Oh I really hate that. When my friends arrive late and
make me wait, I get really angry with them. And waiting for
buses or trains just makes me lose control. Even waiting for just
two or three minutes gets me angry.

Key

1 Rose – lazy 3 Jessica – tidy
2 William – arrogant 4 Brandon – impatient

8a SPEAKInG Ask�students�to�choose�five�adjectives�from�5�and�
6�to�describe�themselves.�Students�then�tell�their�partner�
their�adjectives�and�say�why�they�chose�them.�Draw�students’�
attention�to�the�example�sentence�and�the�use�of�quite and�
a bit�to�make�the�adjectives�weaker.�In�a�less�confident�class,�
ask�students�to�make�notes�before�they�do�this�as�a�speaking�
activity.

3b Ask�students�to�decide�in�which�two�words�we�pronounce�gh
and�how�it�is�pronounced.

Key

gh is pronounced as ‘f ’ at the end of enough
gh is pronounced as ‘g’ at the beginning of ghost

In�general,�we�can�say�that�gh�is�not�pronounced�before�‘t’�
(bought) and�in�the�middle�(daughter) and�at�the�end�of�many�
words�(although).�However,�gh�can�be�pronounced�as�a�‘g’�at�the�
beginning�of�the�word�(ghost) or�an�‘f’�at�the�end�of�the�word�
(laugh).

Extra activity
Students�who�finish�early�could�think�of�more�examples�of�how�
gh is�pronounced,�e.g.�thought, through, light, ghastly, ghetto,
rough.

4 SPEAKInG �In�pairs,�students�take�it�in�turns�to�describe�the�
people�in�the�photos,�using�adjectives�from�1.�Draw�students’�
attention�to�the�example�sentences�and�the�use�of�little to�
soften�the�adjective�overweight.�In�a�less�confident�class,�
brainstorm�descriptions�of�the�photos�and�write�key�phrases�
on�the�board�before�they�do�this�as�a�speaking�activity.�

Example answers

Photo 1 (Lewis Hamilton): He’s tall, dark and handsome. He’s got
short, curly hair. He’s good-looking and quite well-built.
Photo 2 (Kate Beckinsale): She’s very pretty. She’s medium-
height and a little thin. She’s got long, dark hair.
Photo 3 (Jack Black): He’s short and a little overweight. He’s got
long, dark hair.

Adjectives
Many�adjectives�describe�qualities�that�can�exist�in�different�
degrees,�such�as�size,�beauty,�age,�etc.�These�adjectives�are�
often�called�gradable�adjectives,�because�they�can�be�used�
in�comparative�or�superlative�forms,�or�with�grading�adverbs�
such�as�very, a little, a bit,�to�show�that�a�person�or�thing�has�
more�or�less�of�a�particular�quality.�We�can�use�words�like�very
to�make�gradable�adjectives�stronger�or�words�like�a little, a bit
to�make�gradable�adjectives�weaker.�

When�using�more�than�one�adjective�to�describe�a�noun,�
place�the�adjectives�in�the�following�order�before�the�noun:�
1�opinion�(interesting) 2�dimension�(big) 3�age�(old)�4�origin�
(Spanish)�5�material�(cotton).�We�don’t�usually�use�more�than�
three�adjectives�before�a�noun.

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: LAnGuAGE

Personality
5 Students�match�the�personality�adjectives�with�their�

opposites.

Key

1 d 2 e 3 a 4 c 5 f 6 b

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Project
4 In�small�groups,�students�discuss�which�icons�are�typical�of�

their�country�(food,�drink,�sports,�clothes�etc.)�and�make�a�list.�
Each�person�in�the�group�then�chooses�an�icon�and�finds�out�
more�information,�photos�and�pictures.�Each�group�decides�
how�to�present�their�information�to�the�rest�of�the�class.�Allow�
some�class�time�for�preparation�and�presentations.



how to teach a project
Mini�projects�help�promote�autonomous�learning�and�provide
a�motivating�break�from�routine.�Mini�projects�generally
extend�over�three�to�four�classes.�Here�is�a�suggested�plan�for
this�mini�project�on�national�icons:

•� Planning (20/30-minute�session):�Ask�students�to�decide�
what�they�want�to�include�in�their�mini�project,�what�form�it�
will�take,�who�is�responsible�for�what,�how�much�time�it�will�
take�and�the�resources�they�will�need.�Discuss�the�proposals�
with�each�group�to�ensure�they�are�possible/�realistic.�It�
is�a�good�idea�to�have�examples�of�past�projects�to�show�
students�what�they�are�aiming�for.

•� Preparation (20-minute�session�×�2):�Provide�students�
with�materials�for�making�a�poster�if�they�wish�to�do�so:�
card,�scissors�glue,�paper,�etc.�You�may�also�wish�to�arrange�
access�to�the�Internet�and�presentation�software�such�as�
PowerPoint.�If�this�is�not�possible,�ask�students�to�do�their�
computer�work�at�home.

• Presentation (20-minute�session�×�2):�Schedule�a�
presentation�session�at�the�end�of�the�project.�Ask�each�
group�to�prepare�a�task�for�the�other�students�to�do�
while�they�are�listening�to�their�presentation�(a�quiz�with�
questions�if�it�is�a�wall�display,�comprehension�questions�for�
a�PowerPoint�presentation,�etc.).

• Evaluation Consider�how�to�evaluate�students’�
presentations.�The�following�format�allows�you�to�grade�the�
different�aspects�of�each�project:

Content�� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

Design� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

Language�level� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

Oral�presentation�skills� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: CLASSRoom TIPS

Popular culture: ‘She’s Leaving home’
by The Beatles
Inside information
Before�students�read�the�text,�direct�their�attention�to�the Inside
Information�box�about�the�Beatles.

1 �1.04�Students�read�the�task.�Play�the�CD�for�students�to�
listen�to�the�song�from�the�album�and�put�the�pictures�in�the�
correct�order.

Key

1 d 2 b 3 e 4 a 5 c

2 Play�the�CD�again�for�students�to�read�the�words�and�decide�
who�says�the�parts�of�the�song�in�italics.

Key

The parents

Word booster
Students�match�the�words�and�definitions�before�they�do�the�
writing�activities.�Elicit�answers�from�students�around�the�class.

Key

1 f 2 b 3 d 4 a 5 e 6 c

3 Students�imagine�they�are�the�daughter�and�write�a�letter�to�
their�parents�before�they�leave�home.

Suggested answer

Dear Mum and Dad,
It’s Wednesday, five o’clock in the morning, and I have decided
to leave home. I need to start living my own life. I have met a
man and I want to be free and have fun. Thank you very much for
everything you have given me. Love Julie.

4 Students�now�imagine�they�are�the�parents�and�write�a�reply�
to�their�daughter’s�letter.

Suggested answer

Dear Julie
We are very sad that you have decided to leave home. We
sacrificed most of our lives for you and gave you everything
money could buy. We think you have treated us thoughtlessly
and we don’t understand how you can do this to us. We
struggled hard all our lives and never thought of ourselves. We
would like you to tell us what we did that was wrong.
Your loving mum and dad.

5 What about you?
In�small�groups�or�pairs,�students�discuss�if�they�know�any�

Beatles�songs.�They�say�if�they�like�them�or�not�and�give�
reasons�why�or�why�not.�Direct�their�attention�to�the�example�
dialogue.�They�then�discuss�what�type�of�music�they�like.

Extra activity
Students�write�a�questionnaire�about�what�students�like�and�
dislike�about�music.�Students�interview�each�other�and�write�a�
short�report�with�the�results�from�their�survey.

DVD (optional) �
A Hard Day’s Night (director: Richard Lester; 1964)�

Plot:�A�‘typical’�day�in�the�life�of�The�Beatles,�including�many�of�
their�famous�songs.�

Resource materials: See Unit 1 CLIL worksheet on page 180.

homework
Refer students to the Workbook, page 6.

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Listening p12

Carrying out listening tasks
Students�need�to�be�taught�listening�as�well�as�practising�
listening.�An�ideal�listening�class�should�include�some�
instruction�about�how�to�listen�effectively.

Students�need�to�carefully�read�the�instructions�and�questions�
to�know�what�they�are�listening�for,�predict�content�(from�key�
words�in�the�questions�or�visual�clues�etc.),�learn�to�use�their�
intuition,�take�good�notes�during�the�listening�and�decide�on�
the�right�answer�based�on�the�information�they�have.�At�the�
end�of�a�listening�task,�try�to�develop�a�class�discussion�based�
on�students’�opinions�(the�What about you? section�provides�
questions�for�discussion�based�on�the�listening�text).

Ask�students�to�evaluate�how�well�they�did,�whether�they�
thought�it�was�a�difficult�task�and�why.�For�the�CEFR�dossier,�
students�could�record�the�listening�activities�they�have�done�
in�class�on�a�self-evaluation�sheet.�They�can�write�the�subject,�
date�and�evaluate�their�progress.�

I�understood�the�first�time�I�listened.� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

I�understood�when�we�had�finished�listening.�� 1� 2� 3� 4� 5

I�understood�after�listening�with�the�audioscript.��1� 2� 3� 4� 5

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: STuDEnT TRAInInG

Warmer
Write�these�questions�on�the�board�and�ask�students�to�discuss�in�pairs.
1 Are you an animal lover or a pet person?
2 What pet do you think makes the best pet? Why?
3 Why are people so devoted to pets?�

1 In�pairs,�students�make�guesses�to�match�the�people�and�
the�pets�in�the�photos.�Elicit�possible�answers�from�different�
students�around�the�class.

2 LISTEnInG � �1.05�Play�the�CD�for�students�to�listen�to�five�
people�talking�about�their�pets�on�a�TV�programme�and�check�
how�many�predictions�in�1�they�got�right.�In�a�less�confident�class,�
pre-teach�some�of�the�more�complex�words�from�the�listening.�
Elicit�the�meaning�of�these�words�from�students�or�write�them�on�
the�board�and�read�out�the�definitions�for�students�to�call�out�the�
matching�words:�telepathy�–�the�ability�to�communicate�directly�
with�each�other’s�minds,�without�using�words;�look�after�–�take�
care�of�something�or�somebody.

Key

1 a 2 d 3 e 4 c 5 b

3 �Play�the�CD�again�for�students�to�note�down�the�number�
of�the�speaker�next�to�the�statement.�Elicit�answers�from�
different�students�around�the�classroom�and�ask�them�to�
justify�their�answers�with�information�they�have�heard�in�the�
text.

Key

1 Speaker 4 4 Speaker 4 7 Speaker 5
2 Speaker 1 5 Speaker 1 8 Speaker 4
3 Speaker 5 6 Speaker 3

Audioscript�

PResenteR: Our next report on Animal Mania looks at the relationship
between you and your pet. There are often jokes about people
being similar to their pets, or perhaps we should say, their pets
being similar to them. But in a recent experiment, people were
given photos of five pet-owners and their pets. Two out of every
three people in the experiment matched the owners to their pets
correctly! So we decided to go out and ask pet-owners what they
think. Are there similarities between them and their pets?

PResenteR: Excuse me, madam. Can I ask if you have any pets?

sPeakeR 1: Yes, I have a small dog.

PResenteR: Do you think you and your dog are similar?

sPeakeR 1: Oh yes, yes, I do. We understand each other. I know
what Tinkerbell is saying or what she wants just by looking
at her. And if I have a problem, Tinkerbell comes and does
something to make me feel better. It’s like telepathy!

PResenteR: Hello there. Do you have a pet?

sPeakeR 2: Yes, I’ve got a tarantula.

PResenteR: Oh really? I was going to ask if you and your pet are
similar?

sPeakeR 2: Well, tarantulas are lazy during the daytime and come
out at night, and people say I’m a bit like that too! Actually I am
quite lazy, that’s why I have a tarantula, cos you only need to
feed it once or twice a week. They’re really easy to look after.

PResenteR: Hi. Is this your pet?

sPeakeR 3: Yeah.

PResenteR: Do you think you’re similar in any way?

sPeakeR 3: Well, I love running and my dog often comes with me.
He seems to enjoy it too. The funny thing is there are days when
we both run really well, but there are other days when we both
get tired straight away. We always seem to feel the same way.

PResenteR: Excuse me, sir. Is this your pet?

sPeakeR 4: Yes, it is.

PResenteR: Do you think you and your pet are similar in any way?

sPeakeR 4: Well, look at us. What do you think? You can see that
we both enjoy our food. You could say that we’re both a little
overweight. Err, that may be cos we don’t like taking exercise
either. I hate doing sport, and Toto hates going for walks. Oh,
now that I think about it, when there’s a song on the radio I start
singing and Toto always joins in and sings with me. Actually my
wife says she can’t tell the difference between us when we sing!

PResenteR: Excuse me. Do you have a pet? Do you think you and
your pet are similar?

sPeakeR 5: Well, I own a pet, but I don’t think we’re very similar.

PResenteR: Why not?

sPeakeR 5: Well, look. I’ve got a photo of it here on my phone. Look.

PResenteR: Oh! I see.

sPeakeR 5: Yes, I wanted a hamster but my mum hates hamsters
and mice. She calls them ‘rats’! So she bought me this instead.

PResenteR: Are you similar in any way?

sPeakeR 5: Well, actually my mum says we are similar. These things
are really good at hiding. They’re quite difficult to find because
they look just like plants and leaves and they don’t move. And
my mum says that she can never find me when she wants help
around the house.

PResenteR: So, there you have it. It seems from our interviews that
there are similarities between their owners and their pets …
even when their pets are a little unusual!

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Extra activity
Students�could�write�sentences�with�tag�questions�on�the�end�
like�the�ones�in�5.�At�the�start�of�the�next�lesson,�they�could�take�
it�in�turns�to�test�their�partner�to�see�if�they�can�give�the�correct�
question�tag.

homework
Refer students to the Workbook, page 8.

Developing writing p15
Informal emails describing people
Warmer
Write�these�three�statements�on�the�board�and�ask�students�to�
discuss�if�they�are�true�or�false.
1 We start an informal email with the word�Dear.�
2 We end an informal email with words like�Take care,�or�Love,�or�

Thinking of you.�
3 When we finish an email we write our first and last name.

Key

1 F (write Hi and the name of the person we are writing to)
2 T
3 F (we write our first name or nickname)

1 Students�read�Joe’s�email�to�his�e-pal�and�name�the�different�
people�in�the�photo.�Elicit�answers�in�open�class.

Key

From left to right: Lucy, Laila, Connor, Freya, Joe

2 Tell�students�to�read�the�email�again�and�write�notes�about�
each�person’s�personality.

Suggested answers

Connor: He is very quiet.
Laila: She is nice but she is sometimes bossy. She is also very
clever and helpful.
Freya: She is really funny and always makes her friends laugh.
Lucy: She is mad, totally crazy.
Joe: He is a bit arrogant (he says he is extremely good-looking!),
sociable, sporty.

Students�may�want�to�find�an�English-speaking�friend�to�write�
to�from�one�of�the�many�penfriend�websites.�Students�often�
prefer�to�use�email�(this�kind�of�penfriend�is�also�called�an�
e-pal).
English�friends:�http://www.pen-friends.net/england.html�
Welsh�friends:�http://www.pen-friends.net/wales.html�
Scottish�friends:�http://www.pen-friends.net/scotland.html�
Irish�friends:�http://www.pen-friends.net/ireland.html�
International�Penpals�is�one�of�the�larger�penpal�
organisations:�http://www.ipfeurope.com�
Remind�students�that�they�should�not�give�out�their�personal�
address�or�phone�number�to�someone�they�have�met�through�
the�Internet.�If�they�decide�to�meet�their�e-pal,�they�should�
meet�in�a�public�place�and�take�a�friend�or�family�member.

Cultural information

3 Ask�students�to�complete�the�sentences�in�the�Writing Bank�by�
looking�again�at�Joe’s�email.�Point�out�that�we�generally�use�
rather�instead�of�quite�with�negative�feelings�or�words.

Key

1 really blonde
2 me
3 she’s having a good time / she can be really bossy sometimes
4 very
5 totally
6 quite

4 Ask�students�to�complete�the�sentences�to�describe�some�of�
the�people�in�the�photo.

Example answers

1 Theo is really good-looking.
2 Jess looks happy.
3 Oscar looks like a clever boy.
4 Jack is rather nice.
5 Sarah is extremely pretty.
6 Jess has got quite long hair.
7 Sarah looks as if she is taking a photograph.

Practice makes perfect
5a Students�find�a�photo�of�themselves�with�friends�or�family.�

Tell�them�to�write�an�email�describing�the�appearance�and�
personality�of�the�people�in�the�photo.�Remind�them�to�use�
the�email�in�1�as�a�model�and�include�words�and�expressions�
from�the�speaking�bank.

5b Students�show�their�photo�and�description�to�their�partner�to�
see�if�they�can�identify�the�people�in�the�photo�correctly.

For�students�who�are�less�confident,�photocopy�the�model�
text�below�for�extra�support�during�the�writing�task.

model text

Hi Sam!
You asked me to send you a photo of me and my family.
So here it is! Can you guess who everyone is? I’m the one
in the black t-shirt. You can probably tell that my sister,
Alison, is sitting next to me. Everybody says we look a
bit like each other. In the photo she’s got medium-length
brown hair but now it is really short. She is an absolutely
fantastic sister, but she is rather bossy sometimes. I’m
sitting next to her daughter, Abby. She’s very talkative.
That’s my nephew, Greg, at the top of the table. He’s
really funny. My mum is at the end of the table. She’s
really patient and helps us a lot. Then there’s my dad next
to her, he’s always cheerful. The photo was taken when we
were on holiday in Puerto Pollença, Mallorca. It’s a totally
amazing place! I want to go back there one day.
Right, I need to go. I’m going out in about ten minutes!
When you send your next email, don’t forget to send me a
picture of you and your family.
Take care
Susie

z

This page is taken from Gateway B1+ Teacher’s Book. It is photocopiable and may be used within the class.
© Macmillan Publishers Limited 2011

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Page 12

34

Assessing writing
Ask�students�to�assess�their�performance�in�each�writing�
activity�in�the�Developing Writing�section�and�give�themselves�
a�mark�according�to�the�following�self-assessment�criteria.�
Their�written�work�and�assessments�could�form�part�of�the�CEF�
dossier.
•� Are�your�sentences�complete?�
•� Is�there�subject-verb�agreement?
•� Is�there�consistency�in�verb�tense?
•� Are�pronouns�used�correctly?
•� Are�all�your�words�used�correctly?
•� Are�punctuation,�capitalisation,�spelling�and�paragraphs�

used�correctly?�
•� Provide�students�with�a�key�to�the�marking�symbols�you�

use�to�correct�texts�to�help�them�grade�their�or�their�
partner’s�work:

WF� wrong�form�
� The�movie�was�the�most�good�WF�she�had�seen.
WW� wrong�word�
� She�smiled�happily�and�sweet�WW.
T� wrong�tense�
� He�woke�and�had�jumped�T�out�of�bed.
∧� Something�is�missing.
� She�arrived�∧�school�on�Monday.
Sp� wrong�spelling�
� The�chair�was�not�confortable�Sp
WO� wrong�word�order�
� When�I�got�to�the�restaurant,�she�already�WO�had��
� ordered�a�meal.
P� wrong�punctuation
� Be�careful,�P�The�train�is�coming.�
V� wrong�verb�form
� She�drunk�V�the�wine�elegantly.
//� new�paragraph�needed
� They�had�dinner�and�went�to�bed.// Next�day�when�
� they�woke,�the�sun�was�shining.
∪� Join�the�ideas�in�one�sentence
� She�sat�down.�∪�She�drank�the�coffee.
?� What�does�this�mean?�
� ? They�waking�up�teeth�brushed�daily.�?
~� change�order�
� She�had�brown~dark�hair.

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: STuDEnT TRAInInG

how to use model texts in class
A�model�is�a�text�that�provides�a�good�example�of�how�texts�of�
a�particular�kind�can�be�written.�Students�will�notice�features�
such�as�layout,�structure�and�fixed�phrases�that�they�can�make�
use�of�in�their�own�written�text.�Model�texts�can�also�develop�
useful�exam�techniques�such�as�planning�and�self-correction.�
Always�read�the�model�text�provided�and�go�through�the�
writing�tasks�in�detail�so�that�students�are�fully�aware�of�why�
they�are�writing�and�who�they�are�writing�to.�

TEAChER DEVELoPmEnT: CLASSRoom TIPS

Resource materials: See Unit 1 Communication worksheet on
page 179.

homework
Refer students to the Workbook, page 9.

Grammar revision p17
Students�read�the�Grammar reference�and�Vocabulary sections�on�
page�16�before�completing�the�revision�exercises.

Present simple and present continuous
1 Students�decide�if�sentences�are�correct�or�not�and�correct�them.

Key

1 I don’t usually go to school by bus.
2 correct
3 My friends and I sometimes play football after school.
4 correct
5 Mia can’t speak to you at the moment because she’s doing

her homework.
6 Where do penguins live, in the Arctic or the Antarctic?

2 Students�put�the�verbs�in�the�present�simple�or�present�
continuous.

Key

a are (you) wearing c ´m going e work
b don’t usually d ´m starting f ‘re saving

State and action verbs
3 Students�choose�the�correct�alternatives.

Key

1 need 4 owns 7 are you looking
2 Do you know 5 don’t seem 8 belongs
3 Are you having 6 prefer

Vocabulary revision p17
Appearance
1 Students�write�the�adjectives.

Key

1 straight 4 well-built
2 overweight 5 bald
3 ugly 6 curly

Personality
2 Students�write�the�opposite�of�the�words.

Key

1 noisy 4 clever 6 lazy
2 untidy 5 unfriendly 7 impatient
3 serious

Synonyms and partial synonyms
3 Students�write�a�synonym�for�each�underlined�word.

Key

1 clever 4 cheerful 6 elderly
2 good-looking 5 sociable 7 difficult
3 hard

You can find the unit 1 tests on the Gateway Tests CD

Gatewayonline
For�useful�and�motivating�additional�practice�across�a�range�
of�skills�and�task�types,�students�can�access�Gateway Online:�
www.gateway-online.net.

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Macmillan Gateway, ISBN 978-3-19-712928-0, Hueber Verlag

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