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Table of Contents
                            CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL LIFE IN LATE ANTIQUITY: AN INTRODUCTION --- Adam Gutteridge and Carlos Machado
BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAYS
	POLITICAL LIFE IN LATE ANTIQUITY: A BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAY --- Luke Lavan
	SOCIAL LIFE IN LATE ANTIQUITY: A BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAY --- Lukas Amadeus Schachner
THE ROMAN STATE: FROM IDENTITY TO POLICY
	CONSTRUCTING ROMAN IDENTITIES IN LATE ANTIQUITY? MATERIAL CULTURE ON THE WESTERN FRONTIER --- Ellen Swift
	COINS AND POLITICS IN THE LATE ROMAN WORLD --- Richard Reece
THE EMPEROR AND HIS MONUMENTS
	CIVIL WAR AND PUBLIC DISSENT: THE STATE MONUMENTS OF THE DECENTRALISED ROMAN EMPIRE --- Emanuel Mayer
	BUILDING THE PAST: MONUMENTS AND MEMORY IN THE FORUM ROMANUM --- Carlos Machado
THE CITY: SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CHANGE
	FORA AND AGORAI IN MEDITERRANEAN CITIES DURING THE 4TH AND 5TH C. A.D. --- Luke Lavan
	THE CONTROL OF PUBLIC SPACE AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF AN EARLY MEDIEVAL TOWN: A RE-EXAMINATION OF THE CASE OF BRESCIA --- G. P. Brogiolo
CHURCHES AND POWER
	ARCHITECTURE AND POWER: CHURCHES IN NORTHERN ITALY FROM THE 4TH TO THE 6TH C. --- Gisella Cantino Wataghin
	DARK AGE ROME: TOWARDS AN INTERACTIVE TOPOGRAPHY --- Kate Cooper, Julia Hillner and Conrad Leyser
	A NEW TEMPLE FOR BYZANTIUM: ANICIA JULIANA, KING SOLOMON, AND THE GILDED CEILING OF THE CHURCH OF ST. POLYEUKTOS IN CONSTANTINOPLE --- Jonathan Bardill
THE MIDDLE CLASS
	ARTISANS AND TRADERS IN THE EARLY BYZANTINE CITY: EXPLORING THE LIMITS OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE --- Enrico Zanini
	MIDDLE CLASS HOUSES IN LATE ANTIQUITY --- Simon Ellis
THE POOR IN TEXTS
	CONSTRUCTED AND CONSUMED: THE EVERYDAY LIFE OF THE POOR IN 4TH C. CAPPADOCIA --- Susan R. Holman
	POVERTY AND SOCIETY IN THE WORLD OF JOHN CHRYSOSTOM --- Wendy Mayer
THE POOR AND ARCHAEOLOGY
	THE URBAN POOR: FINDING THE MARGINALISED --- Steve Roskams
	RURAL IMPOVERISHMENT IN NORTHERN GAUL AT THE END OF ANTIQUITY: THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARCHAEOLOGY --- Paul van Ossel
SOCIO-CULTURAL CHANGE
	SOME ASPECTS OF SOCIAL AND CULTURAL TIME IN LATE ANTIQUITY Adam Gutteridge
	SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE 6TH–9TH C. EAST --- John Haldon
INDEX
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL LIFE IN LATE ANTIQUITY

Page 344

Lexicon Topographicum Urbis Romae—De Rossi’s methodological sug-

gestions have yet to attract the systematic treatment they deserve.4

Since its foundation in 1996, the Centre for Late Antiquity at the

University of Manchester has developed, in the context of collabo-

rative projects, a cluster of research resources for the study of the

city of Rome in the transition from the ancient to the Medieval

world. A common structural feature of these resources is that they

function as sophisticated finding-aids, allowing researchers to explore
the links between source materials in a swifter and more complex

way than is allowed by the traditional search methods, based as they

are on printed indices. The substantive intent behind the develop-

ment of such resources is to loosen the imaginative hold exerted by

the Liber Ponti“calis; this will allow the full evidentiary base for Early
Medieval Rome—from epigraphy to fragmentary (and often anony-

mous) devotional literature such as the gesta martyrum—to influence
the heuristic process of scholarly investigation. Our own interest has

been in how new networks of patronage (both religious and secular)

changed Rome’s urban landscape, with a special emphasis on the

social dynamics of authority and patronage in the Roman church

in the 5th–9th c., but the resources themselves have been designed

to suit a wide variety of uses. In the context of these collaborative

projects we hope to have found a compelling way to fulfil the promise,
and at the same time to test the limits, of De Rossi’s topographical

approach.

T R R

Starting from the assumption that visualisation technology can dra-

matically enhance a user’s ability to analyse complex patterns in our

data, our initiative aims both to construct a digital portal to give

online access to our resources and to use the analytical facilities of

a Geographical Information System (GIS) to foster new hypotheses

about how sources for religious cult, patronage, and clerical activity

4 See, for example, LTUR II, s. v. domus: for a lengthy discussion of the location
of the house of the ex-praefectus urbi Faustus see the passio Pimenii § 4 (ed. Delehaye
(1936) 259–63).

  :     313

Page 345

may be related to one another. While the full realisation of both of

these developments is subject to the continued availability of fund-

ing, it is possible to report here on progress made to date.5

We have developed two electronic finding aids, each designed to
foster swift analytical searches for patterns of distribution among pri-

mary sources otherwise accessible solely through time-intensive man-

ual searches of printed indices. The Roman Martyrs Project surveys

narrative source material for the early cult of martyrs in the city.

Its outcome is a systematic assessment of the gesta martyrum and related

texts, in the form of approximately one hundred dossiers of indi-

vidual martyrs or martyr ‘clusters’, specifying all topographical, proso-

pographical, and inter-textual connections revealed in the gesta

describing their life, passio, and cult.6 In digital terms, this resource

currently exists as a flat-file database—essentially a glorified table—
though a request for funding to enhance the database structure, and

to make it available for use via the Centre for Late Antiquity web-

site, is pending at the time of writing.

Scepticism about the value of the gesta as a source for social history

is, perhaps, best answered with a specific example. Let us take the
well-known case of the Roman martyrs John and Paul, whose church

on the Caelian Hill has recently and splendidly been restored. Beneath

the shrine lie the remains of a Roman domus dating back to the

3rd c. Many enthusiasts (Richard Krautheimer among them) saw in

this residential complex the very house where, according to their

6th c. passio, John and Paul were killed and buried by an agent of

Julian the Apostate (361–363). As Beat Brenk has conclusively shown,

this interpretation of the archaeological evidence in the light of the

much later witness of the passio is untenable.7 However, while this

means that the passio Iohannis et Pauli must be treated with as much

caution as any of the other post-Constantian gesta, the passio remains

unusual in that a 6th c. manuscript copy of the text has survived.

Most of the gesta have come down to us only in later Carolingian

exemplars and may be refracted through the devotional concerns of

5 Support for GIS development has been provided by the University of Manchester’s
Distributed Learning Fund.

6 British Academy major Research Grant, 1996–99, ‘The Roman Martyrs Project’,
directed by Dr. K. Cooper.

7 Brenk (1995).

314 kate cooper, julia hillner and conrad leyser

Page 687

epistolary xxiii
hagiographic xxiii
textual 206–207
textual 535
written 375

spolia 145, 590
state xv–xvi, xviii–xxi, xxv, xxvii,

12–14, 21, 44, 72, 113–15, 117,
120, 122–24, 129, 496–97, 499–502,
504–505, 510–12, 520–21, 524, 605,
607–608, 611, 613, 626, 629–31,
634–35, 637–39

state service 629
state-monuments 144, 146, 149, 154
statue-bases 166, 180–82, 185, 205
statues xxi, 9, 27, 173, 179, 181, 185

dedication of 204–205, 210
honorific 208
imperial 181
movement of 181–85, 187–88
pagan 582–83
portrait 583

status xxiv, 74, 105–106
Stilicho 172
stratigraphic revolution 373, 405
surplus extraction 497, 499, 502
Swift, E. 548
syncretism 591
Syria 621

‘massif calcaire’ 434–35

taxation 22–23, 490, 496, 503, 505
technological development 514
temple

of Caelestis, Carthage 585
of Apollo (Daphne) 584–85
of Artemis ( Jerash) 583

temples 182, 200, 231–32, 581–82, 586
conversion of 585–86
destruction of 584–86

terra sigillata 560
Tetrarchy 29, 144, 161

urban centres 144
theme system 634
Theodosian code 14, 44, 52
Theodosius I 150–51
Thessalonica, tetrapylon of Galerius 145
time

concept of 177, 569–71, 574, 582,
591

cultural 570
social 571, 574, 591

towns 517–19, 613–14, 620, 632–33
townscape 402, 519, 583

trade 100
long distance 510
guilds 414

traded objects 388
traders 375, 379–80, 382, 404–405
tradespeople 470
traditionalism 168, 176
Tübingen Theosophy 586

urban
centres 613
development 492, 494, 612
landscape 259, 280, 313, 388, 398,

402
life 101, 195, 207, 607, 628
prefect 15, 184, 187
prefecture 173
settlement 613
society 415
space 617
topography xxiv

urbanism 235, 614
usurpation 91
usurpers 132, 133
Utica (N. Africa), Lot 11 418, 420

Van Ossel, P. 52, 495
villa of Champion (Gaul) 556, 558
village economy 623–24
villages 621–24
Vinson, M. 447
violence 88–91

political 89
popular 88
religious 90

vows
(religious) 574–75
imperial 575–76, 578

Ward-Perkins, B. 195, 495–96, 511
warfare 19, 611, 613, 618, 629, 636
wealth xxv
western

frontier 16
kingdoms 12, 125

Wickham, C. 501–502, 505, 510–11
women 82–83, 450–51, 456, 476
Wood, I. 108–109
working classes 46
workshops 48, 385, 402

xenodochia 49

Zanker, P. xvii

656 

Page 688

LATE ANTIQUE

ARCHAEOLOGY

Series Editor

LUKE LAVAN

Late Antique Archaeology is published annually by Brill, based on papers given
at the conference series of the same title, which meets annually in Oxford
and at one venue outside the UK. Contributions generally aim to present
broad syntheses on topics relating to the year’s theme, discussions of key
issues, or try to provide summaries of relevant new fieldwork. Although
papers from the conference meetings will form the core of each volume,
relevant articles, especially syntheses, are welcome from other scholars. All
papers are subject to approval by two anonymous referees. The editorial
committee includes Albrecht Berger, Averil Cameron, Beatrice Caseau,
James Crow, Simon Ellis, Sauro Gelichi, Lale Özgenel, Jean-Pierre Sodini,
Bryan Ward-Perkins and Enrico Zanini. The next two volumes, based on
papers given at meetings in 2004 will concern technology and the every-
day spatiality of material culture. Journal abbreviations follow those used
by the American Journal of Archaeology, whilst literary sources are abbreviated
according to the Oxford Classical Dictionary (3rd ed. Oxford 1999) xxix-liv
and when not given here, following A. H. M. Jones The Later Roman Empire
(Oxford 1964) vol.2, 1462-76. Conferences, held in 2005, have covered
religious diversity and late antique paganism.

For programme information and notes for contributors, with contact
details, visit: www.lateantiquearchaeology.com

1. – 2003. Lavan, L. and Bowden, W. (eds.).
Theory and Practice in Late Antique Archaeology. 2003. ISBN 90 04 12567 1

2. – 2004. Bowden, W., Lavan, L. and Machado, C. (eds.).
Recent Research on the Late Antique Countryside. 2004. ISBN 90 04 13607 X

3.1 – 2005. Bowden, W., Gutteridge, A. and Machado, C. (eds.).
Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity. Conceived and Co-ordinated by
L. Lavan. 2006. ISBN 978 90 04 14414 9; ISBN 90 04 14414 5

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