Download Thomas and Rebecca Vaughan's Aqua Vitae, Non Vitis, Bri. Lib. MS, Sloane 1741 _ Thomas Vaughan 2001 a.O PDF

TitleThomas and Rebecca Vaughan's Aqua Vitae, Non Vitis, Bri. Lib. MS, Sloane 1741 _ Thomas Vaughan 2001 a.O
TagsAlchemy Library And Museum Religious Education Further Education
File Size12.8 MB
Total Pages336
Document Text Contents
Page 1

Thomas and Rebecca Vaughans

KquK VrVJE: NON VlTIS

p^s^
siv--^^/^if

^--'^^:^W^ r^^Vn v:^

Page 2

This diplomatic edition and translation of
Thomas and Rebecca Vaughan's alchemical

notebook, Aqua Vitce: Non Vitis: Or, The radical
Humidite ofNature: Mechanically, and Magically
dissected By the Conduct of Fire, and Ferment
(British Library MS, Sloane 1741), is a valuable
record of the actual research of a leading writer

on alchemy and his wife, who was one of the
first women known to have worked as a "che-
mical alchemist." This edition will be of in-
terest to readers of English literature and his-
torians, as well as to those involved in women's
studies.

Page 168

108 AQUA VIT.€: NON VITIS

[fol. 50^] De Sale Nitro.

Digeritur in Veneno suo proprio per dies 8, vel 40: Tunc distillatur. Di-
gestio vero fit igne suavi, et lentissimo, aliter non succedit.

T. R. V.

1661=2.

Spiritus salis.

R: Alkali terrei, et marini partes aequales. adde panim salis gemmse, cum
Ammoniaco ad pondus Alkali. Solve, filtra, sicca. Tunc tere cum Dendro-
colla, et distilla. Omnia Experta in diebus conjugis mese fidissimae.

Sal Butleri.

B. salis tartari, et gemmae ana: tere, solve, sicca, sed prius funde. Vel R salis
naturae calcinati, et salis Tartari ana &c.

Page 169

AQUA VITJE: NOT OF THE VINE 109

Concerning Nitric Salt.

It is decocted in its own proper venom for eight days, or forty. Then it is
distilled. Decoction in truth is accomplished with a sweet and very slow

fire; it does not succeed by any other way.

T. R. V.

1661=2.

Spirit of Salt.

Take equal parts earthen and sea alkali; add a little rock salt with ammonia
in a weight equal to the alkali. Dissolve, filter, dry. Then grind with den-
drocolla, and distill. All this was tested in the days of my most faithful
wife.

Butler's Salt.^'

Take equal quantities of salt of tartar and rock salt; grind, dissolve, dry,
but first melt. Or take equal quantities of nature's calcinated salt and salt
of tartar, etc.

^^ The name Butler was associated with a stone possessed with miraculous curative pow-
ers. J. B. van Helmont related that an Irishman named Butler had cured someone of erysi-
pelas "by dipping a little stone in a spoonful of milk of almonds." The cure worked almost
immediately. See Lynn Thorndike, A History of Magic and Experimental Science, 8 vols.
(New York: Columbia University Press, 1923-1958), 7: 225-26, 233-35.

Page 336

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